An Interview with Steve Rasnic Tem

Published September 23, 2018 by MommaCat

steve rasnic tem b&w

Welcome to Cat After Dark, Steve! It’s so nice to meet you. I’m glad that you were able to take time out of your schedule to let us get to know you a little bit better.

Of course—I’m always grateful for opportunities to talk about my writing.

You’ve been a professional, not to mention award winning author for many years now. Do you remember the first story you submitted and sold to a publisher?

I started submitting stories when I was still in high school, around 1967, mostly to magazines like Fantastic and Amazing. In graduate school I published a lot of poetry in university and small magazines, and some brief pieces of prose (such as a section of what would become my novel Blood Kin in Juice magazine out of Kentucky). But I didn’t get paid for any of that. My first actual professional sale was “City Fishing,” in 1980, to Ramsey Campbell for his New Terrors anthology. I sold it before I was married, so it appeared under the “Steve Rasnic” byline. It’s part of my collection City Fishing.

What are you working on now? What does your writing/publishing schedule look like for the future?

Like most writers my working day is split between promoting and preparing old work, creating new work, and “reseeding” my imagination for future work. My middle-grade Halloween novel The Mask Shop of Doctor Blaack comes out early October, so I spend some time each day talking and writing about it (including doing interviews like this one). I have two story collections coming out next year—Everything Is Fine Now (a collection of YA stories from Omnium Gatherum) and The Night Doctor & Others (the best of my recent horror in a nifty hardcover from Centipede Press)—so I’ve been giving input on covers and endlessly proofing the pages. As for new projects I’ve been working on some science fiction stories about climate change and expanding my zombie story Bodies & Heads into a novel. And in and around all that activity I’m watching movies incl. lots of documentaries, reading books and magazines like Science News, jotting down ideas for stories I may not write for years to come.

If you could spend the evening chatting with any one person from history, who would you choose and why? Language is not a problem.

Helen Keller would be interesting. My late wife Melanie was legally blind, and we talked a great deal about how it was for her growing up, and how her brain processed the limited imagery it received. I would like to get Keller’s perspective on some of those issues.

But if I had the stomach for it, I think I’d really like to talk to Adolph Hitler. He was monstrous, but by definition he was also human. I wonder if I would be able to perceive the evil in him just by talking to him, and if he would seem that much more “evil” than a number of political personages we have now. Would the evil be immediately obvious, or would I have to dig for it? It would be a really useful and enlightening perspective to have.

What makes you laugh?

Pretty much everything, given the right circumstances. The human comedy. I firmly believe that if you’re going to dwell on the dark aspects of life then you need to balance that out with a heavy dose of comedy. So I watch comedic movies and TV shows, and I follow stand-up comedians as well. Some of my current favorites are the ventriloquist Jeff Dunham, Demetri Martin, Sarah Silverman, Tig Notaro, Tina Fey, and Hannah Gadsby—her Nanette special is an incredible blend of comedy and tragedy.

What are your three favorite books? And what are you reading now?

It would be hard to pick just three, but let’s go with Kafka’s Collected Stories, Gabriel García Márquez One Hundred Years of Solitude, and Toni Morrison’s Beloved. Currently I’m reading The Silent Garden: A journal of esoteric fabulism from Undertow Publications in Canada. It’s a terrific anthology of weird writings.

Have you discovered a new to you author recently that excited you with their storytelling ability?

That’s a hard one to answer only because we’re living in a golden age of fiction, I believe, and I’m discovering a wonderful new writer I’d never heard of before every couple of months. But the latest would be Olga Tokarczuk, whose Primeval and Other Times is this incredible concoction combining fabulism with a sweeping sense of time and history.

How did you introduce your children and grandchildren to reading? What kind of books do they like?

With both my children and grandchildren I bought them comic books and let them read my own (I’ve always been a huge fan). But for Christmases and birthdays I would also give each of them a large box full of books including Caldecott and Newbery winners and whatever was popular for younger readers that particular year, children’s classics, etc. I wanted them to at least have the opportunity to read the best work for children. They haven’t always continued to read, but I have at least one granddaughter who reads enthusiastically and would like to be a writer someday. Her favorite reading is adventure, fantasy and supernatural tales. For my two daughters it’s true crime, especially anything involving serial killers.

If you could swap bodies with one person for one day, who would it be and why?

I think I’d like to be some sort of forest animal for a day. I think human beings could learn a lot if they could tap into a non-human perspective, especially about empathy for and appreciation of the natural world. It would make us healthier I believe.

What are some of the things you enjoy doing when you’re not working?

I watch a ton of movies, and see a movie in the theaters at least 2-3 times a week. I also volunteer for the Citizen’s Climate Lobby—I don’t want to leave that huge problem for my descendants to solve. I meditate at least once a day, and I play around with visual art—drawing and painting—for my own enjoyment. I think it helps the writing.

How would you like the world to remember you?

Realistically speaking, the world forgets most writers—including the popular ones—within only a few years after their death. And yet to maintain quality I think you have to try to write as if you know you’re going to be read down through the ages. So I don’t worry about what the world thinks particularly. I do hope my children and grandchildren remember me as a good and loving father/grandfather. And that everyone else I love remembers me as someone who cared for them and wanted to make their life just a little better by being a part of it. That’s really as much of the world as I care about in terms of how I’m remembered.

Steve can be found at all your favorite social media sites. Check them out!

Webpage

Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Instagram

 

I posted my review for THE MASK SHOP OF DOCTOR BLAACK on the Random Reviews page of this site back in August.  If you haven’t had a chance to read the review, now’s the time! Then run, don’t walk – or click like a bunny quick to your favorite online retailer and order this book today.  It may be billed as YA, but that’s misleading.  It has kids as the main characters, so that might lead you to think it’s for kids.  Nuh uh.  It’s  for everyone to read every Halloween.  Enjoy!

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An Interview with John F.D. Taff

Published August 1, 2018 by MommaCat

JohnFDTaff

 

Welcome to Cat After Dark The King of Pain! It’s a thrill to have you here, John, I’ve enjoyed reading your stories for quite some time. I guess the obvious place to start is with your nickname. How did you come to be called “The King of Pain”?

Thanks for having me! And thanks for enjoying my stories.

Yes, my “King of Pain” nickname. When Tony Rivera at Grey Matter Press first read my novella collection The End in All Beginnings, he thought of how he could market it and me. What was it that was the thread that kind of drew all the stories together? What he settled on was the emotional resonance that much of my work has. In other words, Pain. So…King of Pain. I think that when it first got out there, we were both a little embarrassed about it. But it seems to have articulated something that many readers have felt about my work, too. And so we’ve both come to embrace it. Grey Matter is publishing a new collection of short stories from me later this summer entitled Little Black Spots, a reference to a line in The Police song “King of Pain.” If that doesn’t say I’ve embraced the nickname, nothing will.

What are you working on now? What does your publishing schedule look like for the future?

I’m actually pretty busy right now. I’ve got that collection, Little Black Spots, coming out this summer. It’s composed of 50% previously published work and 50% brand, spankin’ new stories. I should be able to make an announcement soon regarding my big, sprawling end-of-the-world novel The Fearing. Me and my four blood brothers—Joe Schwartz, Erik T. Johnson, J. Daniel Stone and Josh Malerman—are working on stories for a follow up to our collection I Can Taste the Blood, this one called I Can Hear the Shadows. I’ve got another big iron in the fire with a group of other authors, for a project that should be announced soon. Then, I’m working with Brian Kirk on a project and with Josh Malerman on at least two other things. I’m hoping to have my next novel, He Left, done this summer. Whew. That’s just for this year and next.

What are some of the things you enjoy doing when you’re not working?

I like to read, though that’s getting harder and harder to do, at least for pleasure. Other than that, I love movies, cooking, hanging out with my wife and pugs. We also have a fairly large garden, and I like to tinker around with that. I collect an inordinate number of things, mostly Hot Toys Marvel figures and Star Trek ships. Yes, I’m a geek.

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My Sadie!

A post shared by John F.D. Taff (@johnf.d.taff) on

When did you first start telling stories? Do you remember your first story?

I’ve always, and I mean always had a love for reading, and that led to me trying my hand at writing from a fairly early age, if just to entertain myself. I don’t remember my first story, but when I was young I was really into Marvel Comics and Sherlock Holmes and Ellery Queen short mystery stories. I tried my hand at writing and illustrating comic books, and I remember writing little horror/detective story pastiches. I seem to remember writing some story when was probably 12 or 13 that involved a space shuttle disaster—kind of weirdly prescient—though I don’t remember much about it and don’t have a copy of it anymore.

If you could spend the evening having drinks with any one person from history, who would you choose and why? Language is not a problem.

Hmmm…I’ll answer that in two ways. First, who would be fascinating to have a few drinks with? Poe. Wouldn’t that be an evening? I think he’d be all kinds of crazy interesting. Who would be fascinating in a more uplifting sense? Lincoln. Though he probably wouldn’t drink, and I’d be too frankly amazed to drink.

What are your three favorite books? And what are you reading now?

My three favorite books of all time? Sheesh. I’ll give you three, in no particular order. First, The Throat by Peter Straub, my all-time favorite writer and one of my (if not the) favorite novels. The Second would be The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever by Stephen R. Donaldson, which is actually a 10-book series, and as such is a cheaty way of answering your question. The third (or more precisely the 12th) would be Night Shift by Stephen King. That was my introduction to King and his mastery of the short story and as such occupies a special place in my reading heart.

Right now, I am reading Priya Sharma’s lovely All the Fabulous Beasts, a collection of her beautiful short stories, and Unbury Carol by Josh Malerman. I love Malerman’s work. His collection Goblin was one of the absolute best books I’ve read recently, and this new one and its weird western vibe has really hooked me. I just finished Brian Kirk’s upcoming book Will Haunt You, which is a stunner, and Erik T. Johnson’s brilliant dark fantasy Sunday, which he wrote with Michael Bailey. Look for these two books soon.

If you could switch bodies with one person for one day, who would it be? What would you do?

Oh lord, probably someone younger and thinner. And I hesitate to share what I’d do, other than eat and make myself fat all over again.

When you write, do you usually listen to music? If so, what type? Does it affect your storyline?

Yes, I generally have music going when I write, to help me set the mood. But I can’t listen to music with lyrics, as it makes it difficult for me to write. So a lot of classical music and soundtracks. But music plays a huge role in my writing, showing up in my stories and helping to define characters. I also love musicians who are great lyricists, as I look to song lyrics to help me with titles.

What were your favorite books growing up?

I loved anything Sherlock Holmes. Books on ghosts and UFOs and the Loch Ness Monster and the Yeti and Bigfoot aWnd other paranormal stuff played a major role in my reading list. I also loved books like the D’Aulaire’s Book of Greek Myths and Book of Norse Myths. Science fiction (Clarke, Asimov, Heinlein) and fantasy (Tolkien, Donaldson,Vance, Silverberg, Zelazny) also played a huge part in my reading as a teenager. When I finally got into horror, it was Poe, King, Straub, Rice, Garton, Ketchum, Barker. They were the biggies.

How would you like the world to remember you?

If I’m remembered at all, I’d like to be remembered as a writer that people liked to read. And, of course, a helluva nice guy.

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Well, since doing this interview last spring LITTLE BLACK SPOTS was delayed.   So, I still haven’t read it as it’s still going through the editing process and has a publishing date of September 11, 2018.   Keep watching the Random Reviews page since I’ll update that as soon as I finish what is sure to be an awesome read.  

Be sure to follow John on Twitter.  Keep up with his incredibly prolific writing schedule. His webpage is worth checking out – don’t forget to bookmark it!  And as you can see from beautiful Sadie’s picture above, he is also on Instagram.  One of these days I will figure out how to maneuver my way around there…

 

 

A 2nd Interview with Luke Walker

Published April 12, 2018 by MommaCat

LukeWalker

 

Welcome back to Cat After Dark, Luke! It’s great to have you back.

Luke sent me his manuscript DEAD SUN while he was still editing it and told me that he plans to self-publish it very soon. So that’s the first thing we’ll talk about. At the risk of saying too much – I despise spoilers – I’ll let you know it’s about life, death, angels, demons, and ummm saving the world. Does that about sum it up, Luke? What else would you like to say? When can people buy it?

DEAD SUN is a dark fantasy (or light horror) about all the fun things you mentioned. Angels, demons, dead people and saving the world. All worlds as it happens. To sum it up, there’s a midway point between life and death where the dead are met by a loved one who’s passed on and then guided to Heaven or Hell – and neither place is exactly as you might expect. Problem is, there’s a blockage because someone has convinced dead people their lives have been unfairly cut short. They’re going no further forward so this midway point is growing. Soon, it’ll be in our world which is why angels and demons are involved along with a woman named Emma who’s looking for the soul of a deceased family member. Unless they can work together and undo the blockage, everywhere will become this dead world.

Most of my stuff is dark horror; Dead Sun is quite a bit lighter although the stakes are as high as I usually go. More so, probably, seeing as all of reality will be destroyed by. . .I’m not saying.

What are you working on now? What does your publishing schedule look like for the future?

I’ve got a few things on the go. After signing contracts with Hellbound Publishing for two books (The Unredeemed and The Dead Room) recently, I will soon have work to do on them. Also, Kensington Gore will be republishing my novella The Mirror Of The Nameless which has been out of print since last year. They’ve contracted me for a new novel, as well, which is outlined and looking pretty fun. So, I’m looking at four books over the next year or so. I did write the first draft of a new book earlier this year but with these contracts and books, that will have to wait a while.

What are some of the things you enjoy doing when you’re not working? And how you spend your time if there were no restrictions in place – either time or moneywise.

There’s not a lot of time that doesn’t involve writing or my 9-5, but when I am free, it’s reading, films (usually bad action or foreign horror) and time with my wife and friends. Occasionally, I sleep. And I do like a small glass of sherry at Christmas.

If you could go back in time and change one thing (knowing with absolute certainty what you were doing was right), what would do?

Wow. A heavy one. I’m with Dr Weizak in The Dead Zone when John Smith asks him about going back in time.

Or, you know, if there was a modern-day equivalent, I’d probably do the same without needing to travel in time.

What would your last meal consist of?

Depends on the manner of my death. I would say a good curry but that could be unpleasant for all concerned. How about a nice steak and a few pints? Yeah. I can dig that.

Find everything you ever wanted to know at:  www.lukewalkerwriter.com

Luke’s Twitter address – @lukewalkerbooks

Follow Luke on Amazon and get news on all of his books here.

And here’s the kick-ass cover for DEAD SUN!

DeadSun

An Interview with Robert Dunn

Published August 5, 2017 by MommaCat

RobertDunn

Welcome to Cat After Dark, Robert! It’s so nice of you to take time from your vacation to let us get to know you a little bit better. Maybe we could start off with your vacation….

What are you up to? Obviously you can’t quite get away from writing, since you’re doing this, but are you having some other sort of fun time?

Thanks for having me. I’m taking a bit of a vacation to meet my second grandson. He’s nine months already and I got to hold him yesterday for the first time. What fun! His name is Robert too. How great is that?

And you’re right, there is no getting away from the writing life. The fantasy of course, is that we can write books and everything else is hammocks and boat drinks. Heck, writers can’t even make their own schedules the way we always dream. I’ve travelled across the country dragging my laptop so I can talk with you, set up promo work on my latest Katrina Williams mystery, A PARTICULAR DARKNESS, edit a work in progress, and keep up with the unending e-mails.

But there is always room for a little fun.

What are you working on now? What does your publishing schedule look like for the future?

Always working! I just sent off the manuscript for A MOMENTARY LIFE, (Hurricane) Katrina Williams book 3. My original agreement with Lyrical was for two books with an option for a third. Right after I sent off the finals on the second book my editor gave me the news that they wanted more Katrina stories. I was happy with that and jumped right on the third book. So A PARTICULAR DARKNESS Katrina Williams #2 comes out 9/12/17 and you can look for two more books next year.

Weaving through that same bit of time I was writing a gritty, border noir called DEAD MAN’S BADGE. That found a home with an amazing publisher, Brash Books. I’m busy getting that ready for a first quarter 2018 release.

The currently writing, work-in-progress is a near future science fiction/horror novel that I’m thinking will be a short novel. I won’t have time for a 100,000 word book with all the commitments for mysteries.

What’s on your bucket list? Have you crossed anything off lately?

My bucket is so leaky. It seems like anytime I have a new inspiration for something I want to accomplish, I get drawn off by something else. Focus is not always my strong suit. Most of the things I really want to do are more personally fulfilling than adventurous. There is always an old car waiting to be restored but I end up simply keeping my truck running. There is always the big book deal, but I keep working on all the great smaller ones without worrying about the dream deal. And there is the hammock I dream of. Now that’s a big bucket thing for me. Maybe I need a one of those fund me things for the world’s best hammock. I have a perfect spot on the back porch.

 

 

When did you first start telling stories? Do you remember your first story?

I recall very well a story about a WWI flying ace chimp. He flew a biplane with machine guns that fired bananas. That was 4th grade I believe. I remember also that instead of saying, The End, I capped it off with an end page that read, The Living End.

After that I wrote things constantly. I wrote plays for the class to perform in 5th and 6th grades and novelized a comic book series in spiral notebooks. It never stopped from there.

What would you put in your backpack if you were to spend a week on a deserted island?

Toilet paper. You never know about the accommodations on those deserted islands. After the essentials were taken care of I would stuff the backpack with my laptop, I’m (almost) always working. My Kindle loaded with a few great books. A solar charger because I think of those things. And then I would worry about how to bring enough ice and diet Dr. Pepper.

tpdrpeppersolar-charger-kindle

 

 

 

 

What are your three favorite books? And what are you reading now?

Reading now is easy. It is all nonfiction at the moment. I have How To Clone A Mammoth by Beth Shapiro going along with Spillover by David Quammen, Rabid by Bill Wasik and a couple of others. The one by Beth Shapiro is because I’m researching for a novel about animals restored from extinction and genetically modified. The others are because I have an interest in plagues, and disease. Fun guy aren’t I?

Favorite books—that’s hard. At any time that list will shift. But almost always you will find, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, The Killer Angels by Michael Shaara, Stranger in a Strange Land by Heinlein, Salem’s Lot by King, Lonesome Dove by Larry Mc Murtry, and something from Craig Johnson, one of the many greats from James Lee Burke and anything by Shelby Foote.

Limiting it to three favorite books—I don’t think I can decide.

Who influenced your writing the most? Do you think you are still evolving?

Those are questions that are definitely tied together. I am still evolving from the early influences of Poe, Robert Lewis Stevenson, and Edgar Rice Burroughs. I loved adventure and horror but the books I had access to were mostly classic. For a long time I thought that was the way “real” books were written. That shifted as I discovered comic books. Later, I was drawn to science fiction in large part by the incredible cover art. I fell under the influence of Heinlein, Asimov, Clarke, and Bradbury. They led me to Vonnegut and many other wonderful authors. In each phase the influence of the authors was like seasonings in a stew. They blended and spiced everything I did. After that I began reading mysteries. I went from Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie to Elmore Leonard. But I think I hit my niche with the amazing horror and thriller novels of the 1970’s. I read so much King, Blatty, Benchley, Masterson, Matheson, Straub etc. there was no way not to be influenced.

I still keep finding new influences and new author loves. It will always be with pride that I point to several reviews of my novel A LIVING GRAVE, that compare that book to those of James Lee Burke.

If you could choose one book to visit for a day, what book would it be and what would you do? (You have healing potions.)

Jurassic Park of course! Crichton was a master. And dinosaurs… How could I not?

What 7 people from history would you invite to a dinner party and what would you serve?

Pancho Villa, Hemingway, Sgt. Alvin York, Sgt. Henry Johnson, Teddy Roosevelt, Colonel James (Jimmy) Doolittle, and Clarence Darrow. We would go to Hooters for wings and talk about manly things.

How would you like the world to remember you?

I don’t care and doubt that it will to any degree. My kids though, and family beyond them—I want them to remember me well and fondly. I hope there are stories told about me for generations. A hundred years from now I can only hope that my descendants know who I was, get an occasional laugh from the family lore, and are proud to have me as part of their heritage.

I’m on FB, https://www.facebook.com/RobertEDunnAuthor/

I’m often on Twitter, @WritingDead

Goodreads, https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/548149.Robert_E_Dunn

Thanks for letting me take part!

Robert

 

 

 

These are books best read in order.  Book one, A LIVING GRAVE introduces Katrina Williams, an Iraqi War vet turned Sheriff’s  deputy.   Author Robert Dunn has created a world of flawed, real people who do stupid, hateful and hurtful things to one another. As a military brat himself he wrote what he knew about and his character Katrina follows in her family’s footsteps and goes for a career in the military, then chooses to join the sheriff’s department.

Her cases are convoluted and gruesome. More power to you if you can figure out the answers by the midpoint! Robert Dunn has done some fine writing, unlike most thrillers out there. The publishers at Lyrical Underground have already asked him for another, and I couldn’t be happier to see this series continue. Fine writing, thoughtful titles and very real scenarios make this a series not to be missed.  You can buy Robert’s books at Amazon, B&N or wherever fine books are sold.

An Interview with Frank Cavallo

Published June 11, 2017 by MommaCat

FrankCavallo

 

Welcome to Cat After Dark, Frank! It’s so nice to meet you. I’m glad that you were able to take time out of your schedule to let us get to know you a little bit better.

Thanks for having me. It’s great to be here!

Are you a full time writer or do you hold down a regular job as well?

In my non-writing life I’m a lawyer. I’ve been at that for about 16 years now, all on the defense side. Initially I worked in juvenile court and then for the last ten-plus years I’ve been trying cases exclusively in felony court, what we call the Court of Common Pleas here in Ohio. Recently I started handling an appellate case load. That’s mostly brief-writing, so I’m still writing even in my non-writing time.

What are you working on now?  What does your publishing schedule look like for the future?

I usually balk at answering this question. The only time I ever discussed an active, unfinished project in an interview it later fell apart.

However, in this case I am legitimately between books, so I really don’t have anything to reveal–or to worry about jinxing. I’ve got three or four ideas sitting on my desk, in various stages of outlining. Some are just sketches. Eventually one of them will pick up steam and I’ll run with it.

What are some of the things you enjoy doing when you’re not working? And how would you spend your time if there were no restrictions in place – either time or dollar-wise?

I love to travel, that’s probably my one great passion after writing. At last count I’ve visited just over 40 countries, and I’m always trying to add to the list. 

If I had as much money and time as I wanted, that’s all I’d do. I would write for a few months non-stop, then take a month or two off to fly to some far-flung spot, backpack around, sample odd food, tour ancient ruins, look at exotic wildlife, etc.

countries

Pick a country…any country..,

When did you first start telling stories? Do you remember your first story?

I do! I was in the third grade. It was Halloween and I wrote a monster story for class, I believe it was a Dracula story (but it might have been a werewolf story, I’m not sure which one I did first, but I know I did versions of both). Anyway, the other kids passed it around and seemed to like it, so I wrote a few more. I’ve been doing it ever since. 

If you could spend the evening having drinks with any one person from history, who would you choose and why? Language is not a problem.

I’m not believer in any particular religion, so none of the standard answers of Jesus, Buddha, etc. have much appeal to me. Second, my tangential relationship to government in my work-life leads me to believe that most political figures, however great their achievements or bold their leadership, are essentially cut from the same cloth. Most are willing to lie or cheat to get to those positions, and probably have to be that way in order to succeed. So I’m not interested in meeting any of them, even the great ones.

That leaves artists, thinkers, philosophers, maybe military types. Not much interest in the latter bunch, but I do think Leonardo, Shakespeare or Einstein would be on the list. However, if I had to pick one and only one, I’m leaning in a different direction. What I’d probably do is pick a fairly random, otherwise-anonymous person and find out everything I could about him or her.

I’ll give you my reasons, briefly. A few years ago I was at the Topkapi palace museum in Istanbul. There’s a section there with grave markers from the Roman era, going all the way back to the days of the East/West split of the Empire. The engravings are haunting, not because they’re unusual, but because they’re so mundane. They’re just like what we write now, two-thousand years later. People missed their parents. They mourned their spouses or their children who died too young, etc. Except for these markers, these people are completely unknown, unremembered and lost forever.

There are literally billions of people who have lived and died over the ages and we know virtually nothing about them. Not only are their names lost, but everything about them: what they cared about, who they loved, what they dreamt about, what they thought the world they were giving to their children would look like. I want to sit down with one of them. I want to find out all of those things from someone that history has forgotten.

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Would you go on Dancing with the Stars if given the opportunity?

No, never. Absolutely not. I don’t care what they pay. There isn’t enough money in the world to get me to do that. I hate dancing.

What are your three favorite books? And what are you reading now?

Seriously tough question!

1) Robert E. Howard’s “Conan the Conqueror” (originally titled “The Hour of the Dragon”) is the first book I really fell in love with. I bought it as a used paperback for five cents at my local library sometime in middle school and read it repeatedly until it nearly fell apart.

2) Frank Herbert’s “Dune” I read one summer in high school, and it opened my eyes to what SciFi can be. It was huge and epic and tackled real, heavy issues. It showed me that speculative fiction could be so much more than spaceships and laser fights.

Dune

3) Super close call on #3 but I’m going to go with Clive Barker’s “The Hellbound Heart.” It’s the first book I read as an adult that just knocked me over and made me say “wow, I wish I could do that.”(Honorable mention here goes to Neil Gaiman’s “Neverwhere.” These two books are so close that if you asked me on another day, in a different mood, I might very well have reversed the order.

Right now I’m reading Mary Beard’s “SPQR” which is a study of the early days of the Roman Republic, the centuries before Caesar that set the stage for what Rome eventually became. I switch off between fiction and non-fiction, and try to read a little of both.

Beard

You just invented a magic portal. Anyone who passed though the portal would be ‘unexisted’. So they would not be missed and life would work itself out. You can send three people through the portal. Who will you send? Why?

That’s another tough one. It’s uncomfortably close to “who would you kill if you could get away with it?” Given my job, I’d be loath to wade into those waters. If I want to be consistent that I am against the use of the death penalty for anyone, no matter the offense, then I can’t in good conscience say that I think I possess the wisdom to use it “properly” if it were left up to my judgment. So I’ll have to abstain on this one.

If you could choose one time and place in history to visit for a day, where would it be and what would you do?

If we’re talking about the entire history of the Earth, then I’d probably visit one day before the Chicxulub impact about 65 million years ago. Take in the last day of the dinosaurs.

What would your death row meal consist of?

A large “Number 8” with everything from Nick’s Pizzeria in Bergenfield, New Jersey. It’s the best sandwich I’ve ever had, anywhere. I’ve literally dreamed about this hero before trips back home to visit. Ham, Genoa salami, capicola, prosciuttini, provolone, lettuce, tomato and onion with oil and vinegar on fresh-baked Italian bread. It is as close to a perfect sandwich as mankind will ever get.

NicksSandwich

How would you like the world to remember you?

I read an obituary recently in which they said the deceased had been “generous and kind to small children and animals.” I can’t imagine being remembered any better than that.

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Are you looking for something a little different to read?  Frank’s newest book, published just this past December is probably just what you’re craving. RITES OF AZATHOTH is a well thought out, super descriptive FBI thriller by way of Lovecraftian science fiction epic. Wow! It was a good storyline and if it seemed a little long in the beginning, I got over that once the story got started and I was invested in the plot, I read straight through to the end in with just one sleep break.

Available at Amazon.com

 

RitesofAzathoth

Thank you for an excellent interview, Frank.  You sound like a fascinating person for whom one interview is not nearly enough!  Thanks so much!

 

An Interview with Stuart R. West

Published April 30, 2017 by MommaCat

stuartwest

 

Please tell us about your upcoming books and their production schedule.

Hey, MommaCat, thanks for letting me yak away on your blog. Demon with a Comb-Over has just been released (it’d been out earlier, but the publisher went under) with a new prequel along for the ride. It’s a (pseudo-autobiographical) tale about a crappy stand-up comedian (that part is true; well, I at least bombed on open-mic night) who ticks off a demon with a comb-over (that part’s not so true).

Dread and Breakfast was released last month. It’s a terrifying (oddly amusing) tale about a bunch of people stranded at the world’s worst bed & breakfast during a Midwest winter storm. It plays heavily on my fear of guys named “Kevin” who constantly shove muffins at you at such places. And it proves the old axiom: fear antiquing.

I’m wrapping up a horror short story collection, starting a new thriller called “Chili Run,” and will soon dig into my third Zak and Zora mystery (the series about a vapid male stripper and his very put upon, no-nonsense detective sister).

Who are the authors that have influenced your writing the most?

Depends on what day you ask me, MommaCat. Hmm. Dick and Jane books. Elmore Leonard. Dr. Seuss. Chuck Dickens. Stephen King. Donald Westlake. John Farris.

Who would you like to have drinks with?

The above-mentioned writers would be a hoot-and-a-half to tie one on with at a round table drinkathon.

Maybe Trump. So I could get him liquored up, ruffle his awful hair and say, “Okay, Don…what’s REALLY going on? You’re joking, right?”

If you could live in (or just visit) any world, real or imaginary, where would it be and why?

I’d say Willy Wonka’s factory. But now we’re being lead by an orange Oompa-Loompa, so that’s not fantastical enough. I definitely want to avoid Katniss’s world. My life expectancy kinda’ plummets there. Perhaps I’d like to live in Stars Hollow. Yeah. Everything there is cute and whimsical.

Most authors have held many many jobs on their way to becoming successful. What are some of the jobs you have had?

I did have a devastating, very short run as a stand-up comedian. But I euthanized that deal and everyone owes me a huge thanks for it.

For several years, I worked at a public relations firm where my duties included driving Whizzo the clown around town while he chain-smoked and hawked loogies out the window (he couldn’t drive because of his huge clown feet). I also got to see Dr. Joyce Brothers in her underwear (public relations is a dangerous and ugly job at times).

Joyce Brothers

If you were able to trade bodies with one person for one day who would it be and why?

Again, I’ve gotta’ pull the Trump card. I’d call a press conference, say “Just kidding” and grab the nearest person to me and declare him/her president.

What are the next three books you’re planning to read?

Sorry, MommaCat, I never plan ahead. On anything. Writing or reading.

If you won a billion dollar Powerball all by yourself, what would you do after the check cleared? Would you say screw the bills and buy a solid gold kazoo? Or something else?

First, I’d buy a new house with certain requirements: swimming pool, Jacuzzi tub and theatre room. Then I’d toss some to charity and all that crap.

What do you like to do when you’re not writing or reading?

I love to watch terrible movies from the ‘60’s through the ‘80’s. The golden age of awful.

What five people living or dead would you invite to a dinner party?

Easy! Andy Kaufman, Adolf Hitler, Salvadore Dali, Charlie Sheen and Phyllis Diller.

How do you want the world to remember you?

With clean underwear please.

Boxers-vs-Briefs-title

 

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Demon with a Comb-OvRer (featuring The Book of Kobal) available in Kindle format and paperback.

Dread and Breakfast: Kindle and paperback.

Stuart R. West Blog: Twisted Tales from Tornado Alley

Amazon author page Facebook Twitter

I read DEMON WITH A COMBOVER way back in the wayback when it was published by Samhain.  You can find my review by clicking on the Random Reviews link on the right hand side of the page.  I probably should have asked Stuart for an interview then, but, nooo.  I had to wait for them to go out of business! All of his books are well written, and combine horror and humor.  That’s really hard to do.  But, when it works what you get is a fun read. Sometimes we want gore and scares, but sometimes it’s good to sit back and relax a laugh a little.  Stuart is a sure thing if that’s what you’re looking for.  Check out his books and see what you think.

An Interview with Glenn Rolfe

Published April 1, 2017 by MommaCat

glenn-rolfe-author-photo

Please tell us about your upcoming books and their production schedule.

I’m currently talking about my re-released pieces. My first novel, THE HAUNTED HALLS, the story of an evil-as-all-hell spirit that takes up residence at a small Maine inn and wreaks all sorts of havoc, has a new eBook edition from Matt Shaw Publications and a new, beautiful print edition from Shadow Work Publishing. Two of my Samhain Publishing novellas just came back out in new editions from Crossroad Press, too. ABRAM’S BRIDGE is a small town mystery/ghost story. Has more of a Ketchum vibe with real life horror at home. THINGS WE FEAR is probably my most ambitious novella in regards to how many issues I tried to tackle within its pages. Each character has their own fight with fear, and of course, it all comes together like one immense car crash. Those are available now.

My next new release will be my novel, BECOMING. I’m aiming to get it out for April 1st. 

This one is about a town where people are vanishing or changing. The stranger things get, the more trouble my three main characters realize they are truly in. Inspired by a mix of James A. Moore’s RABID GROWTH and King’s THE TOMMYKNOCKERS, I’m excited for people to read this one.

Who are the authors that have influenced your writing the most?

For me, King, of course, and Richard Laymon, Jack Ketchum, Bentley Little, and more recently Ronald Malfi and Brian Moreland.

I love the way King and Ketchum work horror into reality. That’s what makes them so huge. Little is just nuts and fun, Laymon had a way of bringing this insanity and viciousness into a pulpy, movie-like realm and keeping you at the edge of your seat. He got a bit ridiculous at times, but like the other, he was fearless in his writing.

Malfi and Moreland are the two authors I look at as my modern gold standard. To me, they’re head and shoulders above the rest right now. They should be publishing with the majors. They are my next King and Ketchum. Their writing is beautiful and characters and stories are fresh and inspiring.

Who would you like to have drinks with?

Well, I had a drink in my hand and a good buzz when talking to Jack Ketchum at a Samhain after-party…does that count?

That was cool. I’d love to have a beer and take in a Red Sox game with King. Can we get that arranged?

If you could live in (or just visit) any world, real or imaginary, where would it be and why?

Man, I’d love to visit Australia. It seems so cool. I mean, besides all their freaky, poisonous critters. I’d consider moving to the west coast of the US, too. New Mexico, Arizona, or maybe Oregon or Northern California.

Most authors have held many many jobs on their way to becoming successful. What are some of the jobs you have had?

Too many. I loved delivering newspapers in the middle of the night. Did that for a long time for extra money. I’d listen to Coast to Coast AM and get all freaked out. Also worked at movie theaters a few times. Free movies is always a great benefit. My current hotel job allows for a lot of reading time during the day and writing time on my overnights.

If you were able to trade bodies with one person for one day who would it be and why?

Axl Rose. I’d love to get up there with that voice and those songs, with Slash and Duff and just go for it.

AxlRose

What are you reading now?

I just started Stephen King’s IT and Michael McDowell’s THE ELEMENTALS. I’ve never read either of them. I’m already in reading heaven.

I’m also going to squeeze in Kristopher Rufty’s new one, SOMETHING VIOLENT.

Do you have any guilty pleasure books/authors? You know the ones…stuff you don’t let your friends see you reading.

Not really. I don’t care what people think. I can admit to enjoying Dan Brown, can’t I?

THE DAVINCI CODE is amazing. I don’t think “page turner” has ever been more appropriate.

What do you like to do when you’re not writing or reading?

Hang with my wife and kids and listen to tunes or watch movies.

What five people living or dead would you invite to a dinner party?

Stephen King, Bruce Springsteen, Noel Gallagher, Quentin Tarantino, Steve Irwin.

How do you want the world to remember you?

However they want, just remember me! I hope to leave a few great books behind.

He’s off to a great start!  This is one author you won’t soon forget.

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I read Abram’s Bridge.  This was a ghost story that was every bit as poignant and heartwrenching as anything to come from the pen of Willie Meikle. Originally published by the now defunct Samhain, it is currently being published by Crossroads Press.  I believe it was Glenn’s debut novella.

It depicts the dark side of life in a small, rural town.  Secrets are handed down from generation to generation.  You’ll be glad you read this.

Buy ABRAM’S BRIDGE at Amazon.com

abrams bridge

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